SDC Concept with Nikki Ivanova
00:00 / 18:31

SDC CONCEPT - description

SDC Concept is a design of a multi-functional community center adaptable for any college campus. It incorporates a library, gym, lounge area, game room, coffee shop, outdoor cinema, and roof garden. The main focus and three pillars of this project is sustainability, democracy, and community. It promotes the idea of widespread equality, open-mindedness, creativity, and innovation. The structural shape of the building is inspired by Bjarke Ingels’ 8 house, which has a green roof and slopes downward at the end to join back down to the ground. The project aims to create a spacious design that incorporates a lot of greenery in order to maintain a positive and tranquil atmosphere, so it is a place where students can feel relaxed however stressful college may be.

FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

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Welcome to The Pitch, a podcast about youth architecture projects around the world. My name is Vitoria Carneiro Zhu.

And I’m Nikki Ivanova. In our episodes, we’ll explore how each of our guests is changing the world, be it through innovation, sustainability, aestheticism, or just simply creating solutions.

Today, our guest is our very own…

Me!

 

So, usually, Nikki would be a host on our podcast, but today, she’s here for her very special project called the SDC Concept, which is a design that, really, I’m very interested in hearing about.

 

Thank you very much. Yeah, so, the SDC Concept is a design of a multi-functional community center, which is adaptable for any college campus, and I incorporated a library, a gym, a lounge area, a game room, a coffee shop, an outdoor cinema, even, and a rooftop. The main focus of my project was sustainability, democracy, and community. And, yeah! Sort of the inspiration was from Bjarke Ingels’ 8 house, which has a green roof and slopes downwards to join back down to the ground. And I wanted to create that, sort of, flow of people with the architecture, so you can walk from the ground up onto the roof and back down. And, yeah, I aimed to create a spacious design with a lot of greenery to maintain the positive and tranquil atmosphere. Yeah, I guess, some students at colleges may be quite stressed, so, this area would be a place to relax and, yeah, see friends.

 

Yeah, definitely sounds like somewhere where I would like to be. You did say— I mean, your project name, SDC, you said stands for sustainability, democracy, and community. And I know that, obviously, we’re very aware of sustainability becoming very relevant in modern architecture and, sort of, you know, pushing for eco-friendly designs, as well as community. We know a lot about how architecture is supposed to make you feel welcome and supposed to create a community of sorts, in the way it exists, I guess, in society. But, I was wondering, I mean, why democracy? What would you say is the relation to architecture there?

 

So, democracy is, I guess, the social equality and equal rights; everyone’s opinion is valuable in all parts— aspects of life, and, within my design, I wanted to demonstrate democracy by creating an open space for all students, without any limitations or discrimination. So, it’s, sort of, an open area for absolutely everyone; no limitations.

 

Yeah, I like that a lot! I don’t think I’ve heard architecture as being described in that sense before, or, even, using the word democracy. But, yeah, that makes sense. I mean, even just looking at your design, it is very, like— the way that it’s shaped, is almost, like, inclusive and making everyone equal in the way that it’s symmetrical, first of all. So, yeah, I think you did, artistically, a good job. Which, I mean, leads me to wonder what the primary purpose of SDC Concept was, both architecturally and then artistically.

 

Yeah, so, as I said before, it was inspired by Ingels’ 8 house, with the sloping ramps that join down, back to the ground and— so that it— again, with the democracy and community, sort of, openness and symmetry in my design, I wanted to create fluidity through my design. As people move and interact with the space, they walk down the courtyard, down the steps, and then through the building in the center, but then also the other way, from left to right, moving— walking from the ground up onto the roof garden, then back down.

 

Yeah, and I think that you definitely, with the roof garden— it, sort of, opens up the building completely. Like, it doesn’t feel— I mean, it feels open. It creates that movement upwards by opening it up. And, yeah, I mean, the way that it’s shaped, obviously, it’s like I said before: very round, very symmetrical. Yeah, I think that I definitely see how the architectural intention is clear, as well as the artistic. So, very interesting. And, obviously, the roof garden would be, I’m assuming, for sustainable, eco-friendly purposes, so, I guess my question here would be, then: in what ways does your project, does SDC Concept, respond to the global movement of sustainability and eco-friendly architecture that we see is rising very quickly nowadays?

 

Yeah, definitely, I feel that a lot of designs nowadays have a lot of sustainability aspects within them, so, I wanted to add, on top of my coffee shop design— as that space would be not really used for much— I wanted to add solar panels on its roof. In such climates where there is a lot of sun, I think that it’d be a good place to place them and to generate clean electricity for appliances within the coffee shop and potentially in the main center building. And then— another use of natural sunlight in my design is the path on the roof garden. It’s made out of glass, which allows sunlight to enter through the roof, and then it goes down and optimizes natural light in the library, gym, and rooms below, which I think is a sustainable design and very efficient, and, sort of, creates natural light which is sort of rare in modern buildings sometimes. And...yeah! There’s also— I wanted to add natural ventilation to my building— a natural ventilation system— which takes in fresh air from intake ducts at the bottom of the building and then the air naturally moves upwards through the building, then passes through ducts in the roof where the air leaves. And then, also, mechanical ducts, which extract moisture from areas.